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Alaska Airlines cancels hundreds of flights after mid-air door plug blow out

Alaska Airlines was forced to cancel 20% of its flights on Monday after the Federal Aviation Administration ordered the grounding of some Boeing 737 MAX 9 planes in response to last week’s mid-air ordeal that saw a door plug blow off mid-flight.

As of Monday morning, the airline had already axed 139 of its flights, according to the FlightAware tracking site.

The airline also canceled 165 flights — or 21% of scheduled departures — on Sunday, which the Seattle-based carrier said affected nearly 25,000 guests.

It wasn’t immediately clear how many passengers would be affected by the latest cancelations.

Alaska Airlines said the cancelations would continue through the first half of the week.

It comes after the FAA on Saturday ordered the temporary grounding of 171 Boeing 737 MAX 9 airplanes in order to run inspections in the wake of the Alaska Airlines mid-air incident. 

Alaska Airlines was forced to cancel 20% of its flights on Monday after last week’s mid-air door plug blow out. NTSB/SWNS
The Federal Aviation Administration ordered the grounding of some Boeing 737 MAX 9 planes in the wake of the incident, which resulted in Alaska and United canceling hundreds of flights. REUTERS

“They will remain grounded until the FAA is satisfied that they are safe,” the agency said of the affected 737 MAX 9 jets in a statement on Sunday.

In addition to Alaska, United Airlines is among the biggest users of the jets. United had canceled 221 — or 8% of its scheduled departures — by Monday morning, according to FlightAware.

Alaska Airlines Flight 1282 was forced to make the emergency landing last Friday when the plane’s door plug blew off after taking off from Portland, Oregon — leaving a gaping hole in the left side of the jet and threatening the safety of the more than 170 people aboard.

Alaska Airlines Flight 1282 was forced to make the emergency landing last Friday when the plane’s door plug blew off after taking off from Portland, Oregon. NTSB/SWNS

Harrowing accounts have emerged from passengers in the wake of the ordeal — including one woman, Emma Vu, who sent what she thought could be her final message to her parents: “Please pray for me. I don’t want to die.”

“The masks r down. I am so scared right now,” Vu wrote to her parents in texts she posted in a TikTok video.

The door plug was later found by a Portland school teacher in his backyard, the National Transportation Safety Board said.

“We are really pleased that Bob found this,” said NTSB chair, Jennifer Homendy, who would only divulge the educator’s last name. “We’re gonna go pick that up and make sure that we begin analyzing it.”

Written by SaleemBaloch

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