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Journalists caught joking about Trump assassination: ‘Like JFK’

Two media members were heard cracking jokes over a hot mic Tuesday about former President Donald Trump being cut down by an assassin’s bullet as they waited for him to appear at the federal courthouse in Washington.

The unidentified male journalists had their news cameras stationed outside the E. Barrett Prettyman US Courthouse when they started to grouse about the difficulties of getting a view of the 77-year-old 2024 Republican frontrunner.

“You know what the worst part is? Even if he has his window open and he’s hanging out of it, he will be on the other side of the street,” one person could be heard saying on the live feed from the Associated Press.

“I mean, if he’s driving, we’ve got a good shot,” the second reporter said hopefully, to which the first replied: “Yeah, if he’s driving with the front window open.”

The conversation then swerved into gallows humor about the former president arriving in an open-top car like the one John F. Kennedy was riding in when he was assassinated in Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963.

“Yeah, or if it’s a convertible,” the second person said.

“Yeah, I wasn’t thinking about that,” replied the first.

“Yeah, like if he just pulls up —” the second started to say before the first interjected and asked: “Like JFK?”

The media members waited for former President Donald Trump to appear at the federal courthouse in Washington and joked about his assassination. REUTERS
The unidentified male journalists had their news cameras stationed outside the E. Barrett Prettyman US Courthouse. REUTERS

“Maybe someone, just like they told JFK, ‘You know what you should do? You should take a convertible! It’s so nice out,” the media member continued, to laughter from his cohorts.

Trump faced a DC appeals court panel to hear his attorneys argue that he should be immune from charges in connection with his attempts to overturn his 2020 election loss and the Jan. 6, 2021, Capitol riot because he was not impeached and convicted first in connection with those events.

“To authorize the prosecution of a president for official acts would open a Pandora’s box from which this nation may never recover,” argued Trump’s attorney John Sauer, asserting that by that precedent, presidents could be prosecuted for giving Congress “false information” to enter war or for authorizing drone strikes targeting US citizens abroad.

The pair joked about the former president arriving in an open-top car like the one John F. Kennedy was riding in when he was assassinated in Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963. Getty Images

The outcome of the arguments carries enormous ramifications for the landmark criminal case against Trump, and will also likely set the stage for further appeals before the US Supreme Court —  which last month declined a request to weigh in on the former president’s immunity claim, but could still get involved later.

A swift decision is crucial for special counsel Jack Smith and his team, who are eager to get the case — currently paused pending the immunity appeal — to trial before the November election. 

But Trump’s lawyers, in addition to seeking to get the case dismissed, are hoping to benefit from a protracted process that could delay the trial well past its scheduled March 4 start date and into the heat of the presidential campaign.

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Written by SaleemBaloch

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