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Small-town Pennsylvania drag show goes on despite angry local protest: ‘Not in this community!’

A pair of drag queens sashayed peacefully into a tiny Pennsylvania town Saturday after hundreds of residents campaigned to shut down their show for allegedly violating anti-pornography laws.

The show went on after conservatives in sleepy Millersburg, Penn., a Susquehanna River village with a population of just 2,541, erupted last month when local group Pride in the Valley announced a “Drag Dinner” fund-raiser in a storefront coffee shop.

“We thought it was fantastic, we would come again,” said attendee Nancy Rose who came from Sacramento, Pa. to the event, where potential protests failed to show up outside the Peace of Mind Cafe.

Drag queens Sarabesque and Sedusa were billed as the “sickening entertainers” at a $25 adults-only soiree at the 34-seat lunchroom on Millersburg’s main street.

Three days later, an anonymous opponent launched an online petition demanding “visual barriers” to block the cafe’s plate-glass windows during the gender-bending acts, citing a local ordinance outlawing any “performance which is pornography” where children can see it.

“The content of a drag show is inherently sexual in nature and has no business being exhibited to minors in Millersburg or anywhere else,” the appeal — which racked up 773 signatures — read.

“Not in this community!” wrote petition signer Jason Morrison.

A pair of drag queens sashayed peacefully into a tiny Pennsylvania town Saturday after hundreds of residents campaigned to shut down their show for allegedly violating anti-pornography laws. Rod Lamkey – CNP

“Take your sick social agenda and go bankrupt.”

On Dec. 20, opponents faced off at a hastily called meeting of the Millersburg Borough Council — where boosters claimed cross-dressing as a form of high art and detractors damned it as a sign of societal collapse.

“Would you send a petition to Shakespeare?” demanded Pride in the Valley organizer Heather Holloway, local news station WGAL Harrisburg reported.

“This is a battle between good and evil,” countered an unidentified resident.

The show went on after conservatives in sleepy Millersburg, Penn., a Susquehanna River village with a population of just 2,541. Rod Lamkey – CNP

After an hour of debate, the six-member council voted 4-2 to let the show proceed with no screens required.

The victory spurred Pride in the Valley to book three additional Drag Dinner seatings on Saturday and Sunday, all of which promptly sold out.

Protest leader Steven Blayer, pastor of nearby Hillside Christian Fellowship, said he accepted the council’s decision.

“Just because other places allow these types of shows, doesn’t mean Millersburg has to do it,” Blayer told the weekly Citizen-Standard newspaper.

Drag queens Sarabesque and Sedusa were billed as the “sickening entertainers” at a $25 adults-only soiree at the 34-seat lunchroom on Millersburg’s main street. Google

“But I feel really good about our community coming together with disagreements and walking away in a spirit of peace.”

Peace of Mind Cafe owner Krystle Shearer told the Post she was happy the event went off without disturbance.

“I really love this community,” said said.

“Everyone is welcome, it’s ok for people to disagree.”

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Written by SaleemBaloch

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